Three Sampdoria Weekly Stories April 7

The “Three Sampdoria Weekly Stories” posts will be about news stories concerning Sampdoria on and off the field.

This blog post will talk about the Doriani’s latest Serie A victory against Inter, the removal of Massimo Ferrero as club president, and the on-going rumours regarding star attackers Luis Muriel and Patrik Schick.

Il Doria Register Shock Victory at San Siro

Sampdoria defeated Inter 2-1 at the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza on Monday night CET and the Doriani demonstrated their ability to compete against the bigger teams under Marco Giampaolo.

The Nerazzurri dominated possession and opened the scoring thanks to Danilo D’Ambrosio after 35 minutes but Fabio Quagliarella and Bruno Fernandes both hit the posts.

In the second half, Samp drew level thanks to a controversial equaliser from Schick. The Czech starlet touched the ball with his studs after Matias Silvestre directed a powerful and looping header towards goal.

There were no doubts about the winner as Inter midfielder Marcelo Brozovic blatantly committed a handball in the penalty area and Quagliarella smashed the ball into the roof of the net.

In the past, Sampdoria would usually struggle to get any points in these type of games, but under the coaching of Giampaolo, Il Doria have shown that they are capable of completing comebacks and matching it with the best.

Ferrero Forced to Step-Down as Blucerchiati President

On Wednesday a ruling from the FIGC stated that Massimo Ferrero has to vacate his role as Sampdoria president after his involvement in the bankruptcy of Livingston Airlines.

In February 2016 Ferrero was sentenced to a year and 10 months by a tribunal in Busto Arsizio near Varese in northern Italy for fraudulent bankruptcy but he has not served any jail time.

Due to new regulations made by the FIGC after Parma went bankrupt in 2015, anyone involved in a company going into insolvency cannot become the president of an Italian football club. The 65-year-old Samp president cannot hold that role anymore but he can stay as the owner.

For Sampdoria fans, this decision was on the cards and should not come as a surprise. Media reports would regularly question the fiscal strength of Ferrero, and although he is admired for his charisma, he is not the type of man the Blucerchiati should have as a club patron.

He has maintained Sampdoria’s reputation for being a selling club and any club debts present have been wiped-out through the sales of players. ‘Er Viperetta’ as he is known has also been unstable with transfer market decisions, and in his first two seasons, he sold key players in the middle of the campaign which destabilised the squad in the process.

Reports suggest that family members will take on key roles at the club but he is better off selling the club.

Sampdoria Strikers Still Linked with Inter

Luis Muriel and Patrik Schick have been linked with a move to Inter in the European summer as the Nerazzurri should be free of Financial Fair Play regulations.

One report suggests that both strikers could depart for €50 million but Schick could remain in Genoa on loan.

If both forwards leave at the end of the 2016/17 season, it would once again illustrate that Samp are a selling club and that they are not willing to build-up a team.

As talented as Muriel is, he can be inconsistent and he does not work as hard as Eder, who has a much-better work ethic but he has struggled to adapt at Inter. Do the Biscione need another striker to warm the bench or be no more than an impact player?

Keeping Schick at Sampdoria would be great but if he is sold to the Milan giants before the 2017/18 season and he ends up blossoming, it would be an economic failure of sorts for the Blucerchiati.

If the Czech prodigy scored an abundance of goals in 2017/18, his market value would rise and €25 million would seem like a bargain for Inter.

Il Doria needs to retain as many players as possible and if players have to be sold, they must be sold for a huge profit.

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